3 Parts of a Great Church Website: part 2

By | 2019-02-07

Why does your Church exist? Who are you here for?

As mentioned in part 1, the church exists to bring God’s love to broken people – both inside and outside the family of God.

As we take our cue from Jesus, we see that ministry is holistic and multi-faceted. Word and deed walk hand-in-hand, expressed in a thousand different ways. Jesus didn’t merely sit on the Mount of Olives and teach. He fed the hungry, was an instrument of healing to the sick, and in doing so ushered in a whole new reality called “the kingdom of God,” secured by his cross and resurrection.

And now he keeps touching and loving people, through us, his bride and church:

“…for Christ plays in ten thousand places,
Lovely in limbs, and lovely in eyes not his
To the Father, through the features of men’s faces.”
(Gerard Manley Hopkins)

Make Your Mission Clear

Why do we mention this in an article about websites? Because your church website provides a great opportunity to convey more than just service times, parking instructions, and directions. Those things are necessary, but say little about purpose, and why you’re really here.

For example, consider the photo above. The Commons shows you, on their main page, a church hard at work serving the community. They purposefully avoid the stereotypical things that people normally associate with churches – a pastor in a pulpit, or a picture of the outside of the building – attractive though it may be.
Rather, what they show us is an appealing vision of people who are radically “others-centered,” brining healing to a broken world. This is Christ’s love in action.

This is crucial, because too often, churches send the exact opposite message in their promotional materials and on their websites. The message, whether intended or not, is perceived in this way: “We are perfectly happy and healthy, so be like us,” or “I’ve got all the answers, let me teach you.” or even worse, “Our politics are the Christian ones, so see things like us…” The problem is, these things simply aren’t reflective of the Gospel of grace.

In an age that prizes authenticity, we must embrace our brokenness, and our call to be “wounded healers.” Photos, video clips, and stories of grace, prominently featured on our site, will help us do just that.